Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Top 5 Things to do in Sisters, Oregon


In the 1880s Sisters was a supply station for sheep men passing through to pastures in the high Cascades in the summer. In the 1930s, the timber industry boomed and Sisters had several sawmills in or near town. By 1963 the last sawmill closed and the population declined. 

Fortunately, tourist-related travel increased and Sisters became know as the Gateway to the Cascades. Now Sisters is a tourist destination. Winter has nearby skiing and summer has things like the Sisters Outdoor Quilt Show. Held since 1975, the quilt show brings people from all over. 12,000+ on quilt show day!
In no particular order, here are my top five things to do in Sisters, Oregon.

1. Stop by the Stitchin' Post, Sisters' magnificent quilt shop. Pick up some fabric, patterns, or buy tickets for the quilt show raffle.
2. Eat healthy and search out that vegan bakery. Our choice is Angeline's Bakery & Cafe. We don't go for the bakery items, but for the fresh juice. Beet based and kale based are both yummy. (What kind of freaks search out a vegan bakery for juice - and love it?)

3. Check out the llamas. Stay at the Best Western Ponderosa Lodge and you'll find llamas in the corral right there.
You'll also find Canadian Geese and squirrels sharing breakfast.
And deer are roaming right there, too.
4. Check out the Three Sisters, the potentially active volcanoes in central Oregon. An old story suggests that the mountains were originally named Faith, Hope, and Charity in the 1840's by members of a Methodist missions. The Three Sisters mountains are a popular location for hiking, climbing, and camping.

But right now they are best viewed by me through my camera lens on a spectacularly beautiful morning. And they are best viewed with Canadian Geese flying by.

5. Eat unhealthy. Every time we come to Sisters I stop at the same place and have the same dessert. 
If you ever stop in Sisters, you have to go to The Gallery Restaurant and have a piece of their marionberry pie. Best pie in the world. Or at least in the United States. (Remember, I've been to all 50 states so I know what I'm talking about.)